March 6, 2013 Farm News

Be sure to look on our “Our CSA Program” page to view our 2013 farm brochure which is mostly about our 2013 Community Shared Agriculture (CSA) way of doing farming.    Note:  March 7, an error on the brochure has been corrected. 

This past week has been cool again, actually real cold a few nights and the days have not been too comfortable when that wind blows. The maple sap is not running yet; the weather forecasts for the coming days does look a bit more promising as the temperatures are predicted to be around plus 4 or 5 at times during the days and maybe -2 or -3 celcius overnight so this should make the sap flow. Aerron has tapped a lot of trees this year and will have all the possibles done in a day or so. We have somewhere around 50 trees that can be used, a very few are large enought to have 2 or even three taps, so we might end up with about 75 taps total. We could probably find a few extra Manitoba maple but we’ll just wait a bit and see how the sap flows.

We saw a single coyote yesterday, and this was our first sighting in a very long time. They are about, we see tracks and hear them yipping and howling but the sightings have been rare. He (or she) looked real good, healthy, but our dog spotted him and began barking which sent the coyote off for cover. Often the coyote will, when spotted by our dog, hang around at a safe distance just watching and some times will tease the dog trying to lure her closer. But mostly they just watch and disappear. Aerron saw two swan like birds but wasn’t certain what they were except he didn’t think that they were tundra swans. These swans should be migrating through here very soon now and we are keeping watch. Usually we first observe them by hearing their call. So nothing exotic, the usual geese, ducks and all the smaller birds, a large number of crows one day and of course several bunny wabbits.

We used the horses on sunday to bring up several sled loads of firewood. That was a labour saver for us and a good workout for the horses. We will need to start working them gradually more frequently now to get them ready for the hard work of soil preparation in the early spring. At that time we sometimes do 3 to 5 hours of pretty hard work for them using the disc harrows or the single row cultivator as we prepare the garden for the vegetables to be either seeded or transplanted. That is about the limit for them.

Not too many photos this week. Read the captions beneath them. Have a look too at out new “links” page where I have placed web address that we have found to be interesting, stimulating and therefore useful.

A pile of freshly cut branches, mostly Buckthorn, for next seasons burning

A pile of freshly cut branches, mostly Buckthorn, for next seasons burning

Down the hill a little further

Down the hill a little further

The piles of Manitoba cut to stove length and stacked, barn in the backgrund

The piles of Manitoba cut to stove length and stacked, barn in the background

We removed most of these piles using the sled and horses. This is 1oo feet to the left and further down the hill than the first two photos.

We removed most of these piles using the sled and horses. This is 1oo feet to the left and further down the hill than the first two photos.

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