November 7, 2013 Farm News

We will watch this spot each week on this blog to observe the changes as we go through winter and into spring.

We will watch this spot each week on this blog to observe the changes as we go through winter and into spring.

Picture above:   The heading photo on the weekly blog from this one until sometime in the spring, will be a picture of the garden taken from the same spot at about the same time of day so that we can follow the change in the season and how the garden is changing.

The row of green plants on the left is Broccoli, to the right the three row bed of onions but with at the beginning three short rows of celery meant for cut-leaf but which went in to late.  To the left is the garlic oversown with oats.

The row of green plants on the left is Broccoli, to the right is the three row bed of onions but with at the beginning three short rows of celery meant for cut-leaf but which went in too late. At the right is the garlic oversown with oats.

Happenings:    Last Thursday was the last week for the CSA pickups at the farm for the 2013 season and we have been working at cleaning up around and getting ready for winter.   We planted more garlic for next season.   The main crop was in the ground the middle of September and  the garlic cloves being planted now are of several different varieties that we have been growing for a

Two full beds of garlic.  The left side is the standard main variety, music, oversown with oats and the empty looking bed on the right is a short bit of Music and then, you can see where the change is, becomes 6 separated types, Ukrainian, Salt Spring Island, Russian, Persian, Sicilian and Italian.

Two full beds of garlic. The left side is the standard main variety, music, oversown with oats and the empty looking bed on the right is a short bit of Music and then, you can see where the change is at the small wooden stake, becomes 6 separated types, Ukrainian, Salt Spring Island, Russian, Persian, Sicilian and Italian.

number of years.  They have country or region names such as Israeli, Korean, Italian, Sicilian, Salt Spring Island and there are about a dozen others.   Whether they actually have any connection with the various names is a moot point but they very well may have and they are definitely different in many ways including growth habit, size, dates of maturity etc.  We also winterized our chicken house to make it

Horses, sheep and goat taken a few weeks ago.

Horses, sheep and goat taken a few weeks ago.

warmer and more comfortable for our dear young hens.  The lay rate is still off a bit and probably will remain below the maximum of which they are capable until warm weather and longer daylight hours return round about next May.

Horses, Cows and Sheep:   The lot are still out on their regular

Our Border Cheviot sheep, the one in the foreground is a lamb born late last winter.

Our Border Cheviot sheep, the one in the foreground is a lamb born late last winter.

pasturage every day though the grass is really  running out and we will have to move them to their winter pasture spots soon and begin to feed out hay regularly.  Don’t want to do that too soon as they are now all eating too much hay to supplement their pasture as it is.

Sheep:    Our sheep are primarily of a breed known as the Border Cheviot, an

The cheviot sheep again.  The black sheep (mostly it is really a brown ) are cheviot still but we are not sure where the black comes from, the genetics at play here.

The cheviot sheep again. The black sheep (mostly it is really a brown ) are cheviot still but we are not sure where the black comes from, the genetics at play here.

English breed from the region around the Cheviot Hills.  Ours probably have some other breed in them too but they do have the expected appearance of Cheviots and they act like Cheviots too.  Some of our ewes had coloured hair, speckles, on the face and legs but we have been gradually eliminating this trait.  The Cheviot is a medium sized sheep will often lamb twins and make good mothers.  The Cheviot will thrive on poor pasture and gain a good weight without needing grain though we have been supplementing their pasture with grain.

Check our   Farm Gate Sales   page for what we have available for sale.

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