December 4, 2013 Farm News

The usual heading pic looking more and more drab.  Kale still nice and green.

The usual heading pic looking more and more drab. Kale still nice and green.

The green kale still looking pretty good but drying a little more now.  Still as good tasting as ever.

The green kale still looking pretty good but drying a little more now. Still as good tasting as ever.

General info:

I’ll be doing a bit of a shorter post week from now onwards, unless of course I can find a whole lot of interesting tales to relate.  Follow the farm on our Facebook page as well.  I’ll post a short note and photos there every 3 or 4 days but Facebook does not seem to be the place to convey a significant amount

The garlic beds looking especially drab now as the oversown oats are now turning yellow.

The garlic beds looking especially drab now as the oversown oats are now turning yellow.

of information so I will make longer tirades and post more photos here at this site each week.  I still try to make sure that the posting appears before 7:oo pm every Wednesday.  Comments are few and far between but please do so, I would love to here from you and if you would like me to talk on something in particular, if you have a question on the farm or if you have any photo

Two full beds of garlic.  The left side is the standard main variety, music, oversown with oats and the empty looking bed on the right is a short bit of Music and then, you can see where the change is, becomes 6 separated types, Ukrainian, Salt Spring Island, Russian, Persian, Sicilian and Italian.

Two full beds of garlic. The left side is the standard main variety, music, oversown with oats and the empty looking bed on the right is a short bit of Music and then, you can see where the change is, becomes 6 separated types, Ukrainian, Salt Spring Island, Russian, Persian, Sicilian and Italian.

The goat (far left) and the sheep on a dwindling pasture.

The goat (far left) and the sheep on a dwindling pasture.

requests then let me know that too.

Weather:

This time of year the weather is not always so critical to us as it is during the growing season when we are constantly worrying about to wet or too dry, too hot too cool or any number of other weather things.  We are still adversely affected though.  Wild winds cause concern as does intense cold and snowfall.  Mild spells such as today can be a nuisance as the laneway soon becomes impassable.  It gets far to muddy to travel the driveway and if we don’t avoid using it and we will often stop using it until it refreezes or dries up again. Mild weather is preferable though.  Less firewood is burned, all the animals are more comfortable and happier

A closer look at the sheep.

A closer look at the sheep.

and chickens lay more eggs.  So today is great.

Happenings:

Wood cutting and splitting took a lot of our time and we cleared the oak logs from the front have cut to stove length and piled it in the woodshed with a bout a quarter of it split so far.  Our car, the white Mazda, needed some repairs.  The gas tank had a leak. this

A few days ago, the chickens suddenly found something interesting and 5 minutes later they were all dispersed.

A few days ago, the chickens suddenly found something interesting and 5 minutes later they were all dispersed.

was fixed temporarily with some epoxy as was a leak in the oil pan.  The permanent fix in both cases means replacement parts and that is probably not happening until spring.  So the temp fixes and even maybe refixes will have to carry us through.  I did a pretty good semi-permanent repair to the exhaust pipe and fixed the headlight the was out by wiggling the connection.  So

Three of the dozen or so hens that came over to see what I was up to.

Three of the dozen or so hens that came over to see what I was up to.

the hope is that this will see us through.  We need another vehicle though, one that can function more like a truck, maybe a truck.

Photos:   

The heading photo is the same photo location that I have been using for the past few weeks so that the changes that occur with the season change can be seen.

The rooster was over by the trees, that's him , the white bird to the left, and he made a bit of a warning sound and all the chickens around me immediately and quickly scurried to the shelter of the trees.  The sound he made is to warn of something flying overhead, "Look out Hawk", even if it was only a pigeon.

The rooster was over by the trees, that’s him , the white bird to the left, and he made a bit of a warning sound and all the chickens around me immediately and quickly scurried to the shelter of the trees. The sound he made is to warn of something flying overhead, “Look out Hawk”, even if it was only a pigeon.

Most of the other photos are today’s though if not I’ll note that.

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2 Responses to December 4, 2013 Farm News

  1. Robert Feagan says:

    Something about chickens… Am I right in remembering that chickens have their ancestral lineage in the Pakistan area? I remember hearing that the original apple trees were also from that part of the world, and that the base stock of these trees is on the order of 100 feet high — very different than the cultivated orchards that we are used to.

    • devonacres says:

      As I understand, The chicken had it’s origins in S.E, Asia, Thailand, Viet Nam, Laos area and was a bird of the Jungle. I can’t think offhand of a breed of chicken from the Pakistan area but there most likely are modern chicken breeds which originated in that area as there are breeds from many different parts of the world. Most modern breeds were developed over the last 200 years or so though some breeds are thought to be quite old, the English breed the Dorking for example, is reputed to have come to Britain with the Romans. Someone, I am sure has done some DNA work to determine ancestry and I would like to read that.
      Apples evolved from trees in that general area of the world though, without doing any research I was thinking they came from somewhat more to the west of the Pakistan/Afghanistan area, closer to Armenia and Turkey. Today a standard sized tree (as opposed to a dwarf or semi-dwarf tree) can grow to something like 35 to 40 feet high, maybe a bit more, but I have not heard of the 100 foot claim, interesting, I need to research that, entirely possible of course given the unusual chromosomal construction of Apple DNA. If you grow an apple tree from seed you cannot predict just what you are going to get. You’ll get an apple for sure but size, taste and everything else about it is anyone’s guess.

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