April 17, 2014

 

The usual weekly photo spot on Wednesday noon and much of the previous day's snow has pretty much gone.

The usual weekly photo spot on Wednesday noon and much of the previous day’s snow has pretty much gone.

On Sunday, making the first pass with the cultivator for 2014.  The horses and cultivator are way down near the end of the garden. Those are garlic beds to the left.

On Sunday, making the first pass with the cultivator for 2014. The horses and cultivator are way down near the end of the garden. Those are garlic beds to the left.

We now have three little calves, nice looking little calves and are now milking a total of 5 cows, at least Aerron is doing the milking, once a day, the mornings.  Two of the cows are giving very little milk now so Aerron will dry them off and continue with the three who have just calved and come in to milk.  We collected about 4 litres of milk from a few of the early milkings when the milk still

The horses and Aerron on the cultivator making the second pass returning on the same bed.

The horses and Aerron on the cultivator making the second pass returning on the same bed.

had a lot of colostrum in it.  We used this milk to make a custard; ‘Calf’s Milk Custard’ is the name it goes by from the book, The Family Cow by author Dirk van Loon.  This custard is made without any eggs or stirring and thickens, when heated for about 4 to 5 hours in a double boiler, because of the albumins in the colostrum milk which thicken when heated.  It is

A follow on view on the same second pass.

A follow on view on the same second pass.

sweetened with sugar or honey.  The colostrum milk is usually taken from the first through fourth milkings.  So much milk.  we are also making a lot more yogurt which is very easy to make and from which we can also make cream cheese.  We also make a lot of a cheese by heating milk for about 1/2 hour then stirring in vinegar or lemon juice to coagulate the milk, to form a curd, which is then

Getting to the end of the third pass.  Notice the snow still there on the far fence line beyond the horses.

Getting to the end of the third pass. Notice the snow still there on the far fence line beyond the horses.

Six beds made with 12 passes of the cultivator. The garlic bed is in the centre, with the marker stakes to show the change in varieties and the newly cultivated beds are to the right.

Six beds made with 12 passes of the cultivator. The garlic bed is in the centre, with the marker stakes to show the change in varieties and the newly cultivated beds are to the right.

This is what the same spot looked like on Tuesday afternoon after the snow fall.

This is what the same spot looked like on Tuesday afternoon after the snow fall.

 

 

drained.  The whey thus drained off makes a good drink but when we have so much it also makes good drinks for the chickens.  This cheese is called simple white cheese or, depending in which part of the world you live in, it will be called a myriad of different names.

We have yet to get to see the team of mares that we are considering buying.  Weather conditions at the seller’s end have not been suitable.  Muddy ground is the problem.  We will get there eventually and then , if we do buy them, we will have to arrange to get them transported down here, it is a bit far to drive them, though I would love to do that.  Then we have to get harness, used will do from either Martin’s or maybe elsewhere.

The recent bit of cool and snowy weather has slowed things down quite a bit though we did get six beds worked up in the garden using the single row cultivator.  We then planted 4 rows of Broad Beans.  More will go in quickly once we get some more warmish weather, like the stuff predicted for next week.

The cultivator all snowed in.

The cultivator all snowed in.

Wimpy during the snow fall wondering who was calling his name.

Wimpy during the snow fall wondering who was calling his name.

 

Spring marches on.

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One Response to April 17, 2014

  1. Robert Feagan says:

    Robin — thanks for the photos, and for the updates on where things are on the farm with planting and so on. I talked with you today already about coming up tomorrow morning — Saturday, to get milk. Just wanted to see if it was possible to get 6 bottles, 2 dozen eggs, and if possible I would like to buy some of that simple cheese you talked about in the post. See you tomorrow morning about 10:00-10:30 — Robert

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