June 4, 2014 Farm News

 

Three and a half Horsepower vs. about 400 Horsepower. Reality vs. absurdity. Hay and oats vs. diesel.

Three and a half Horsepower vs. about 400 Horsepower.
Reality vs. absurdity.
Hay and oats vs. diesel.

 

Study in contrasts; modern and old; sustainable and not; quiet and noisy;

Study in contrasts; modern and old; sustainable and not; quiet and noisy;

WEATHER:  The garden had been getting dry so the 32 mm (1.1 inches) of rain Monday evening and overnight was welcomed.  The pastures and trees were still looking good but rain is always welcomed there too.  This will be good for all the garden; seeds still not germinated, newly emergent seedlings, young transplants and those few things that are well established.  The strong winds the past few days seem to be rather hard on the plants but no damage has been noticed.


 

 

Three of the few Lilac flowers growing quite close together.

Three of the few Lilac flowers growing quite close together.

THE VEGETABLES:  Everything seems to be doing quite well.  It is only that we are up to three weeks at least behind where we should normally be.  We are still planting and will be doing so for a while and everything will work out.   A few consequences of the long cold weather are now fully apparent.  Our Redbud tree (about 15 years old) has died; there are far few blooms on the Lilacs and on the Apple trees and we lost about 75 % of our Garlic planting (with some varieties it was 100 % loss).  The vast majority of things survived quite well though and aside from the lilac there were extenuating circumstances.  Other Garlic, not early fall planted is flourishing and the Redbud was still in recovery mode from the drought of 2012.

 

Using the wheeled cultivating tool with the plow attachment to make the furrow for transplants.

Using the wheeled cultivating tool with the plow attachment to make the furrow for transplants.


 

 

A nearly solid bed of arugula for about 1/4 of the bed with radish and newly seeded dill beyond, is on the left and a three row bed of onion sets in the middle with spinach for half of the bed on the right; beets being on the far half.

A nearly solid bed of arugula for about 1/4 of the bed with radish and newly seeded dill beyond, is on the left and a three row bed of onion sets in the middle with spinach for half of the bed on the right; beets being on the far half.

 

Four rows of Broad Beans and four rows of peas to the right.

Four rows of Broad Beans and four rows of peas to the right.

 

 

Aerron on the McCormick-Deering single row horse drawn cultivator with Marie, the near horse, and Wimpy, providing the power getting set up at the beginning of a new bed.

Aerron on the McCormick-Deering single row horse drawn cultivator with Marie, the near horse, and Wimpy, providing the power getting set up at the beginning of a new bed.

 

This was before the rains so the field was quite dusty.  Aerron was using the cultivator to make up seed beds.

This was before the rains so the field was quite dusty. Aerron was using the cultivator to make up seed beds.

THE LIVESTOCK:  The cattle and sheep are now out on pasture and though a little late they are happy.  The four horses are getting along together though the two pairs mostly just ignore each other.  They need to be moved to fresh pasture soon.  The laying hens are putting out the eggs better than ever even though many seem to be going through a molt and are looking quite scruffy.  the new chicks and the ducklings are still doing fine and getting little feathers.  They will need to be given access to the outside later on this week.  It is especially needed by the ducklings as they are very good at snorkeling through the water spewing large quantities out there beaks and on to the ground making a mess of there pen in less than 10 minutes.  First a larger pen for them.


 

 

The cattle herd on really nice fresh good length grass pasture.

The cattle herd on really nice fresh good length grass pasture.

 

The flock and a single goat heading over the hill intent on the grass.

The flock and a single goat heading over the hill intent on the grass.

 

The chickens out scavenging.  This is how they spend a lot of their time.

The chickens out scavenging. This is how they spend a lot of their time.

HAYING TIME:  Anytime now we will be getting a call from our neighbour down the road telling us that he is going to cut the hay.  Then 4 to 5 days after we would have to start hauling hay up from their field near the river, something like a mile and a half from home.  The hay is baled up into those large round bales and we can get 4 bales on our wagon at one time.  There will likely be from 35 to 40 bales so that would be a minimum of 10 trips and we can do no more than 4 to 5 trips per day.  So if we can get the new team to behave and they work well the job should be done in two days.


This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s