August 31, 2015 Farm News

A view of the garden from the customary spot. Quite a bare spot in the middlewhere the beans are and if we are quick we can get some things planted there. New lettuce to the left running up to the Korean mint growing large with the pretty purple, lavender like flowers.

A view of the garden from the customary spot.
Quite a bare spot in the middlewhere the beans are and if we are quick we can get some things planted there. New lettuce to the left running up to the Korean mint growing large with the pretty purple, lavender like flowers.

We have not had any real good rainfall in quite some time.  I didn’t note the date of the last good rainfall nor the dates and amounts of the rains since, however, the last good rain was in the order of two inches over two or three days but subsequent rains have been in the order of 2 or 3 tenths of an inch and that is not enough.  When plants are mature and growing they need about an inch or so  of rain each and every week, for optimum growth.  Two or three weeks with inadequate amounts of rain and plant growth is somewhat stunted, the plant does not grow or produce to it’s potential and of course going too long without rain sort of kills the plant eventually.

Tomatoes far left, then Chard, Peppers in the centre, Okra, just not growing, and onions beside sprawling tomatillos. Our very productive weed.

Tomatoes far left, then Chard, Peppers in the centre, Okra, just not growing, and onions beside sprawling tomatillos. Our very productive weed.

Four rows of Kale with the tomatoes to the right and then the Chard

Four rows of Kale with the tomatoes to the right and then the Chard

Rows of Broccolli with Eggplants to the left and lots of arugula and radish growing between the rows.

Rows of Broccolli with Eggplants to the left and lots of arugula and radish growing between the rows.

So we have been irrigating regularly, pretty much all the time we can.  We use a single sprinkler, as that is as much as our water pressure and volume will keep going.  This waters a circle of about 20 feet in diameter when set at about half a meter above the surface of the ground.  This gets moved every 3/4 of an hour or maybe every hour.  There is a bit of an overlap so it takes several hours to water the 300 foot length of our garden, and two or three days at least to get the whole garden done.  We do not run the sprinkler at night as it has to be moved by hand and no one is willing to do a night shift.  Not when we have to also do the day shift.

Leucan, Nell and Marta heading for the shade. The morning is starting to get real hot and humid.

Leucan, Nell and Marta heading for the shade. The morning is starting to get real hot and humid.

Our best hope would be for a bit of a Hurricane drifting up from the States.  Of course that would not bode well for all those in it’s path on the way to us so I cannot wish for that.  We’ll just have to rely on one of those systems that drift in from the American north west or the south west.  Those same systems that have been regularly coming our way and sort of dissipating and losing strength as they get here or as they cross Lakes Huron and Erie.

The garden however has been doing really well, even if not as well were all the conditions optimal.  But then conditions are very seldom optimal. All of our crops are also way behind were they should be at this time in the growing season and for most of the crops they are going to eventually produce well.

Chickens and ducks eating some weeds.  They untiringly will dive after anything thrown into their yard.

Chickens and ducks eating some weeds. They untiringly will dive after anything thrown into their yard.

The tomatoes have a large number of fruits but most are still green.  The ripening fruits are greater in number this week and the hot weather this week should really help. The pepper plants have been struggling all season and though like the tomatoes there are a lot of fruits, the heat has not been there for them and likely they are suffering from cold damage because of those several nights when temperatures went to around 10C.  We should have broccoli this week and lots more next week.  Cucumbers are near ready, maybe a few this week and likely with the heat a large number next week.  Cauliflowers plants look really good but not showing flowers yet.  Cabbages, Chinese (Nappas), Regular old green cabbages and curled leaf, savoyed cabbages are near ready too but at least another week away.  There’s more!!

The pastures are pretty much dried up now though the horses have just been moved to a so far this year unused pasture that will take them perhaps two weeks if we are lucky, to munch through.  Cows and sheep not so lucky.  The hay supply is beginning to dwindle now and we’re hoping that we will be able to get some from a second cut at the neighbours but we’ll need more than that to get through the winter.

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