February 22, 2016 Farm News

The usual Monday morning garden view

The usual Monday morning garden view

 

A pretty good week for the farm as the warmer temperatures mostly made things easier. The laneway was very muddy most of the time and impassable for our vehicles but water was not freezing in watering bowls, troughs and pails or in hoses so that saves a lot of work.  Chickens were going outside a lot more too and they really do like basking in the warmth and the sunshine and happy chickens are, I think, better egg laying chickens.  The horses and the cows benefit from the warmth too, and for them, just as for us humans, life is more pleasant when it is warmer.  Not much in the way of precipitation, pretty much zero. I’m not so sure that a lot of rain or snow is of much benefit to anything right now but when the weather has warmed, and stays warm so that things begin to grow, then the unfrozen ground will be able to take up a lot of moisture, a lot of water, and the more the better to get the ground well soaked far down to keep us going further through droughts that will come in the summer.

The horses with the old mare Marie (27 years) in the foreground.

The horses with the old mare Marie (27 years) in the foreground.

We got all of the hay into the barn on Monday last.  There were 23 of the large 4X5 round bales (4 foot across and 5 foot in diameter) and 12 of the 5 foot large squares ( 3 foot wide, 2 foot high and 5 foot long … I believe).  Theses were delivered by a distant (12 to 14 farms away to the west) neighbour brought on his large trailer and unloaded by his ‘skid steer’ machine, an odd little machine that is quite common on farms and very useful, and which he brought along with him loaded to the back of the trailer.  It was a big trailer hauling 10 of the large rounds and the skid steer in one load.  The skid steer brought the bales up the hill from the road two at a time and dropped them at the door of the barn from where we rolled them in and brought two of the large squares at a time which were placed on the barn floor then pushed back further by the skid steer.  The squares are near impossible for us to move on our own by hand.  Best just opened up and moved in pieces.

The skid steer with two of the rounds coming up to the hay loft doors at the back of the barn.

The skid steer with two of the rounds coming up to the hay loft doors at the back of the barn.

So that was a job well done and just in time as the hay supply was down to pretty low.  There may now be enough to keep us all well fed until the grass is grown and sheep and cows and horses are once more on pasture.

The floor of the hay loft is now looking filled.

The floor of the hay loft is now looking filled.

If you are interested in our vegetable CSA read the ‘Our CSA Program’ page on this website and contact us real soon. The sooner the better.

The Barred Rock and Red Sex Link hens with a single Barred Rock rooster and one white Silkie hen.

The Barred Rock and Red Sex Link hens with a single Barred Rock rooster and one white Silkie hen.

There should be more photos on our Facebook page too.

 

 

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One Response to February 22, 2016 Farm News

  1. Robert Feagan says:

    Just got back from central America (El Salvador) where chickens are part of the scenery everywhere — love how many colours and types there are, and how they run about doing their business, and it is just part of the way of life. Beautiful.

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