June 20, 2016 Farm News

The usual garden view at noon today, Monday

The usual garden view at noon today, Monday

A real short blog this week and I’m very late at getting it posted.

Transplanted kale and Brussels sprouts now in for two weeks and growing well

Transplanted kale and Brussels sprouts now in for two weeks and growing well

We did a lot of transplanting of various veggies, tomatoes, broccoli among others. We had to do a little work in the barn and a little work fencing which took time out of the garden. I had to visit with our neighbour for a while too, so again, time out of the garden.  We also had to do a considerable amount of watering as we are getting very dry once more,  We have set up the sprinkler and it is moved along watering about 6 beds of veggies at once.  We will eventually have some 80 plus beds of veggies planted and to water just 6 of them takes a day and a half.  Watering is done from about 6 or 7 in the morning until about 10 or 11 at night, the single sprinkler head being moved along every one and a half to two hours or so.

The garlic is looking pretty good now but is still a ways off from harvest

The garlic is looking pretty good now but is still a ways off from harvest

The egg hatch day came and a few eggs hatched, day 21 came and went as did day 22 and we had the last two chicks hatch out near the end of day 23,  far too long and those two barely survived and may not be much good really.  From the 48 eggs set only 16 were hatched.  At least two eggs were infertile but I still have not done the post mortem on all the eggs.  Once having done that we should have a better idea of what went wrong.  I suspect the temperature was reading high, such that the incubator temperature was actually somewhat low, too low for a healthy hatch.  The 16 chicks are in the brood house now and are under a heat lamp to keep the temperature at 95F, decreasing 5F each week..  They seem to be alright for now, even the last two.  I’ll be happier after a week has past and they still seem ok.

The chicks hiding around their feeder

The chicks hiding around their feeder

A closer upper of the chick, not so huddled.

A closer upper of the chick, not so huddled.

The chickens are still laying well and eggs are now for sale at the road from our roadside stand which right now is our dark green horse drawn wooden wheeled buggy.  They are also for sale at the usual pick up spot along our laneway near the garden.  Duck eggs and chicken eggs, all free ranged on pasture, let out between 7 and 9 each morning and shut up again around dusk. Racoons are around and looking hungry so we have to put the birds away overnight.

A pretty good looking Rhode Island Red hen. A fine example as it is put.

A pretty good looking Rhode Island Red hen. A fine example as it is put.

Trays of vggies awaiting transplant. Lots of lettuce there.

Trays of vggies awaiting transplant. Lots of lettuce there.

So: Much transplanting needs doing.  Lots of weeding to be done. Have to keep up the watering. I must do a bit of work for our neighbour. We have to get hay in for the coming wintertime.  All the usual chores for the various animals have to be done at least twice each day.  I have to fix the driver’s side window in our car and replace the back window in the truck.   The pole for the single row cultivator needs replacement and the new pole needs holes drilled and to be trimmed to fit.   There are probably a dozen other little chores that are needing to be done too.

Marta and Nell

Marta and Nell

Thank you to those who have been coming out to work in the garden.  Your efforts are much needed and very much appreciated too. If there is anyone out there that would just like to get their hands a bit dirty and learn a little about organic gardening, then we would welcome your help. Send us an e-mail.

The Broad Beans (Fava Beans) are very close to being ready. The large beans are in the large inedible pod.

The Broad Beans (Fava Beans) are very close to being ready. The large beans are in the large inedible pod.

The CSA pickups here at the farm will begin probably week after next , the last week of June.  Not much for the first two or three weeks or maybe even 4 weeks, but, by July for sure, we will have good quantities of many things.

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One Response to June 20, 2016 Farm News

  1. Robert Feagan says:

    lots and lots of work — thank you Devon Acres tribe for all this food-making!

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